Mass Times

Tuesdays: 4:30 p.m. Buswell Chapel



Wednesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays: 7:00 a.m. Buswell Chapel  

    

Saturdays: 5:15 p.m.

7:00 p.m. Spanish

(Sunday Liturgy)



Sundays: 8:00 a.m., 10:30 a.m. & 5:00 p.m.

Contact

Parish Office 719 589 5829

Emergency Sick Call 719 589 3211

Parish Fax 719 589 5820


Location:

Church 715 4th Street

Parish Offices 726 3rd Street


Office Hours:

Mon//Thurs 9am - 4pm

Fridays 9am - noon


Mailing:

P.O. Box 547 Alamosa, CO 81101

Adoration

Adoration in the Buswell Chapel. Wednesdays 1 - 3 p.m.

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A Hundred or Sixty or Thirty-Fold PDF Print E-mail

 

 

 

I will renew my effort with whatever prayer commitment I have allowed to waver or falter the most.





Matthew 13:1-9
Introductory Prayer:
Lord, my prayer will "work" only if I have humility in your presence. So I am approaching you with meekness and humility of heart. I have an infinite need for you and your grace. Thinking about this helps me grow in humility. I trust in you and your grace. Thank you for the unfathomable gift of your love.

Petition:
Lord, may I always respond to your grace in my heart with fervor and active love.

1. Tears of a Sower:
Imagine Jesus preaching to the crowds, hoping for a positive response, but instead witnessing many people turning a deaf ear to his message of salvation. One day he is thinking about this as he watches a farmer sowing seed. He sees birds come immediately and take some away. He sees previously sown seed scorched by the sun. He sees some sprouts strangled by weeds. He then remembers the faces and perhaps even the names of people who heard his message, but who chose not to respond or whose response was short-lived. We are reminded of another Gospel passage: "As he drew near Jerusalem, he saw the city and wept over it, saying 'If this day you only knew what makes for peace -- but now it is hidden from your eyes'" (Luke 19:41).

2. Rebellion or Rest:
The admonition to heed the word of God is frequent in Scripture. In the Book of Hebrews the author warns us to "harden not your hearts as at the rebellion in the day of testing in the desert." The people of Israel responded in this unfortunate way after the exodus from Egypt. "They have always been of erring heart, and they do not know my ways. As I swore in my wrath, 'They shall not enter into my rest'" (Cf. Hebrews 3: 7-11). This helps us foster a healthy fear of the Lord, encouraging us to work hard to conquer all hardness of heart and remain close to Christ so as to enter into his rest.

3. Fruits of Virtue:
"But some seed fell on rich soil, and produced fruit, a hundred or sixty or thirty-fold." The fruit that Our Lord wishes us to produce are virtues inspired by faith, hope and love. If we are growing in virtue each day in imitation of Christ and for love of him, we can be sure we are heeding his voice and are pleasing in his eyes. The greatest of all virtues is charity, a practical and effective love for our neighbor. We can contemplate the lives of the saints to see how these fruits are played out in a way truly pleasing to Christ. Conversation with Christ: Lord, you know how easy it is for me to allow mediocrity to slip into my life. The cares and worries of life often push you and your kingdom to a secondary plane. Grant me the habit of carving out time for you in prayer each day, and carving out space for you in my life and the lives of those under my care.

Resolution:
I will renew my effort with whatever prayer commitment I have allowed to waver or falter the most.

 

 

 

 
faith formation 2014 PDF Print E-mail
 

 

Faith Formation begins September 21st

 

 

 Register at the Parish Office
 
or
 
 
 
 
 
Why are YOU so Special! PDF Print E-mail

 

 

Christian Self-worth: the right and wrong kinds of self-esteem.



Self-esteem is a term that is bandied about at a dizzying rate these days. It is an important issue and definitely merits our attention in the fields of education and psychology. But there are many misleading conceptions of the idea out there, and in order to make sense of them, there are two interesting sources to draw from; an in-depth study from Monsignor Cormac Burke, and a children’s book called “You Are Special” by Max Lucado.

To begin, some sharp distinctions need to be made between the right and wrong kinds of self-esteem. To draw one’s sense of worth merely from what you think of yourself or what others think of you is to build on sand. Yet this is exactly the kind of self-esteem that has wreaked so much havoc over the years, having been promoted since the 60s.

The claim is that a person can build their sense of self-worth by deciding for themselves what is right or wrong, what feels good for them and becoming a ‘success’ purely in their own terms. But what kind of fruit does this unqualified esteem for oneself bear?

Fr. Burke has a very clear and objective answer drawn from some scientific research done by four psychologists in May of 2003. “Having looked at all the existing studies on self-esteem, they found
no significant connection (emphasis mine) between feelings of high self-worth and academic achievement, interpersonal relationships or healthy lifestyles. On the contrary, they concluded, high self-regard is very often found in people who are narcissistic and have an inflated sense of popularity and likeableness” (from “Self-Esteem: Why? Why Not?” Homiletic and Pastoral Review, February 2008).

Read more...
 
If Butterflies Can Change the World, Think About How Much You Can Do! PDF Print E-mail

 

 

 

At this time every year in America, most of us are required to attend at least one graduation ceremony.  And commencement addresses seem intent on informing students that they will somehow stand out in the world—or even (gasp) to “change the world.”

 

Some jaded souls might regard this as absurd—the idea that people can change the world strikes them as well beyond the pale.  When it comes to world-changers, they think of kings, great educators, and inventors, never accepting or even considering the fact that the common man might lead a more meaningful life than these people.  For my part, I have little doubt that each of these students will change the world.  In fact, even butterflies can change the world.

 

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